River Conditions - It's COLD on the South Fork!

Jan - Feb 09

Some warm days >30 degrees! There are fish in the river though - so check out Lee's tips for winter and early spring fishing: (click on the fish)


Real Time River Flow
For real time river flow at Heise click on this link. http://waterdata.usgs.gov/id/nwis/uv?13037500


UPCOMING EVENTS


March 8 - 9, 2013

Linn County Fairgrounds Albany Oregon

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North Idaho Fly Fishing Expo March 22 - 23, 2013

Lewiston, Idaho

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Wasatch Fly Tying & Fly Fishing Expo March 29 - 30, 2013

Sandy, Utah

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The Jimmy Green International SPEY-O-RAMA and Fly Casting Festival

April 19 - 21, 2013 Golden Gate Park in San Francisco

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Western Rocky Mountain Council of the Federation of Flyfishers wil host the first

Rocky Mountain Flyfishing Rendezvous

www.wrmcexpo.org

July 12 through 13, 2013 at the 7N Ranch near Idaho Falls, ID

Fly Fishing destination fun for the whole family - vendors, food, games, contests, classes, demonstrations - for information contact: lee@SnakeRiverOutfitters.com

Seasonal Strategies - Winter and Spring

Fishing in late winter and on into early spring can challenge even experienced anglers. Most of the difficulties relate directly to seasonal feeding behavior patterns which differ significantly from those that are typically exhibited during the summer. This is very true of the South Fork of the Snake River.

During the winter, water temperature and reduced availability of food cause the fish to seek the refuge of deeper holes or runs with less current. This is practical conservation of energy for the fish since they are, to a degree, subsisting until the water temperature increases and causes aquatic insect cycles to change. Under these conditions fish seek those structures in the river that provide the most opportunity for feeding with the least amount of effort. The wise angler will locate holding zones for fish near river features such as riffles with abrupt drop-offs, or deep cuts near submerged rocks or trees. These areas are usually characterized by distinct transitions in the current patterns from fast to slower moving water. Locations where these structural features are present should then be fished thoroughly. Not all of them will produce, but it only takes one good hole to provide hours of line-stretching excitement.

Early spring runoff and higher water levels increase the size of feeding areas, allowing fish to leave their wintertime haunts and move into the new rivulets.From there they spread out and into the multitude of new channels and submerged shorelines where they can opportunely feed on other food sources such as earthworms, minnows, and grubs. Aquatic nymphs will also be on the move. This seasonal shift in both the food supply and water conditions requires a significant but seldom mastered change in tactics. This is the time of year to explore new territory and fish areas just recently covered by the rising waterline. The water may be off-color, but large fish are feeding on the spreading edges of the river. If an angler is willing to fish those new runs, pockets and pools, he may be surprised with a trophy class Cutthroat or Brown
.
  

REFLECTIONS ON THE WATER

I don't know if fishing is an escape or the place that I come home to. A quiet afternoon spent angling offers both fun and enjoyment. There is the thrill I get from being out on the water with a rod in hand my eyes capturing the beauty of creation. I relive experiences like being five years old, back in the wooden rowboat, watching my dad and uncle fly-fish for bluegills in the Illinois strip mine lakes. Other moments in time capture my reflections too, like the joy I felt watching my own sons fly-fishing on the south fork of the Snake.

Fishing brings me into closer communion with the natural world and allows me to forget about the pressure and stress of the manmade environment in which most of us live and work. On the water I become a participant and observer of the natural cycle of life that seems to work so well and effortlessly. Everything has a purpose, place and function and an inherent dependence on each specific part in the ecosystem. Everything fits in this world and life is an endless cycle.

On the South Fork, a day's fishing can bring me into contact with moose, beaver, blue herons, bald eagles, osprey, cold clear water, mountain vistas, and usually, many trout. I concentrate on making a good cast, presenting a fly, watching fish rise from the depths, and the feel of a nice fish at the end of my line. I enjoy diversions like looking under rocks for insect life, watching minnows scatter at my feet, seeing fish feed and sometimes just staring at the river winding its way through the canyon.

It is difficult to describe all the different facets that fishing provides, but it always brings me back home contented, nourished, refreshed, and with a little more sparkle than I had before, like sunlight's reflection on the water.
– Lee Davison

 

 

Net some spring savings
with SRO’s ‘Full Creel Deal’!

Save 25% and get
FREE shipping when
you purchase:

  • 1 pr. Snowbee breathable waders or wading jacket
  • Your choice of single hand or Spey rod
  • Your choice of fly line
  • Your choice of reel

 

 

LEE DAVISON

  • Licensed Idaho Guide
  • Chairman FFF Board of
    Governors for the Guide Association
  • FFF Certified Master Casting Instructor.
Snake River Outfitters is currently planning destination
fishing packages for 2008. These will include personal casting
& fishing instruction at exciting locations including B.C.,
Alaska, Cabo San Lucas & the Bahamas.

Check back soon for forthcoming information!

BOOK YOUR TRIP TODAY!

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To Contact Snake River Outfitters, LLC please call:

208.538.7425
Mon-Fri 9am - 5pm
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You can also write to us:

Snake River
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238 N 4700 E
Rigby, ID 83442

Email: info@snakeriveroutfitters.com

FAVORITE FLIES FOR WINTER/EARLY SPRING:

High water and off color days: Black Leach.

This is usually slow fishing but it produces the largest fish. Fish it fast, fish it slow, fish it deep, and fish it in the weeds and structures near shore.

Any time fly: Prince Nymph.

This is a great producer and has provided many fly fishermen with hours of enjoyment. Don't leave home without it! Fish it near the bottom with little or no drag (dead drift). Focus on structures such as riffle drop-offs and deeper runs with moderate current.

Right time fly: Salmon Fly Nymph.

This is South Fork steak and potatoes during the early spring. I prefer long black or brown rubber-legs, fished deep and near drop-offs or any obstacle that creates a slow water asylum for hungry fish.

ONE LAST TIP– don't hesitate to vary the size of the patterns and fish the Rubber Legs with the Prince as a trailer or dropper. Fishing two flies will usually increase your catch and the leading line manufacturers strongly endorse it. Probably because it usually increases the use of tippet materials by a factor of ten!

South Fork Filet: Golden Stone

The adult Golden Stone could be one of the most under-rated flies on the South Fork. I am convinced that many of the larger dry flies produce takes by trout because they are mistaken for the adult Golden Stone which emerges from the upper Snake River over a prolonged period during early and mid summer, whereas the Salmon Fly hatch normally happens during a brief time frame and marches up the river methodically with few late hatching stragglers. The Golden Stone ranges from one to one and a quarter inches in length and has a pale yellow abdomen with gray overtones. A yellow stimulator provides a good imitation as does the larger Double Humpy or the typical foam bugs with some pale yellow sparkle chenille wrapping the hook. There's nothing like a big dry fly and willing trout to get your heart pumping again!
The Riffle Ripper: Parachute

I prefer the parachute pattern for smaller dry flies for a couple of basic reasons. First, I think they look good to fish from almost any angle, since the parachute gives the appearance of beating wings. Second, they float well in the film surface of the water due to the horizontal hackle configuration. And last but not least, you can select a variety of wing colors that provide added visibility over the traditional counterpart. Generally, I tie these in a size 12, 14, or 16, which covers most of the species coming off the water during the summer. Colors range from light yellow, light gray, light beige, and pale green. Keep a few dark ones just in case.
Shoreline Lunch Pattern: BFT

This is the acronym I use for the "big foam thing". An example of this pattern is the "Chernobyl ant" or "club sandwich". I prefer these with a little window dressing such as rubber legs, dubbing and hackle covered hooks, etc. This larger than life type fly is durable, floats like a flip flop, and actually produces a lot of action and large fish. Size is usually an inch to an inch and a half and can be light or dark colored. These are easy to tie and great for fishermen with limited vision.
The Deadly Dropper: Copper John

A small dropper trailed behind a larger nymph or dry fly is always a good idea on the South Fork or anywhere else for that matter. The Copper John is a consistent producer and an ample supply in different wire colors and sizes is a must for your terminal tackle arsenal. Size 12 - 18 should cover it. This fly, along with the bead head adaptations, can save the day when fishing the South Fork.

I like to fish the riffles, testing the water all the way with the parachute and a dropper. Don't pass up water that you think may be too shallow to hold large fish. A few casts in the shallow water before you walk through any riffles may surprise your wading socks off with a rapid strike and a lightning run to deep water!
Any time fly: Prince Nymph

This is a great producer and has provided many fly fishermen with hours of enjoyment. Don't leave home without it! Fish it near the bottom with little or no drag (dead drift). Focus on structure such as riffle drop-offs and deeper runs with moderate current.
Right time fly: Salmon Fly Nymph.

This is South Fork steak and potatoes during the early spring. I prefer long black or brown rubber-legs, fished deep and near drop-offs or any obstacle that creates a slow water asylum for hungry fish.

   
The Tying Bench

Fly of the Month: Salmo Trutta Shore Lunch
Tying Instructions: This is a terrestrial attractor pattern that can be modified for simulating colors and variations of insects common
to the river you’re fishing. For the Southfork of the Snake, this means yellow and gold materials to simulate the Golden Stone or
grasshoppers. Materials Used: Iridescent materials generally work best such as antron and flashbou. An additional palmered hackle
on the body provides extra floatability and movement.

Lee’s Custom Fly Kit
South Fork Summer Special
This kit contains every fly you’ll need for the varied conditions encountered during summer fishing on the South Fork. These tried and true varieties consistently produce the Cutthroat, Brown and Rainbow action you dream of. Each kit contains 16 hand tied flies, condition specific information for when and how to use each fly, and a pertinent area river map in a clear, dual compartment fly case. Only $35 plus shipping & handling.

 

 




SNAKE
RIVER
OUTFITTERS,
LLC

238 N 4700 E
Rigby, ID  83442

(208) 538-7425
Fax: (775) 871-6558

M-F  9am – 5pm MT

 

 

 


SNAKE
RIVER
OUTFITTERS,
LLC

238 N 4700 E
Rigby, ID  83442

(208) 538-7425


M-F  9am – 5pm MT

 

 




SNAKE
RIVER
OUTFITTERS,
LLC

238 N 4700 E
Rigby, ID  83442

(208) 538-7425
Fax: (775) 871-6558

M-F  9am – 5pm MT

 

 




SNAKE
RIVER
OUTFITTERS,
LLC

238 N 4700 E
Rigby, ID  83442

(208) 538-7425
Fax: (775) 871-6558

M-F  9am – 5pm MT

Does your casting need a tune-up? Mention you saw this note on our website and save 10% on your Spey or Single-hand casting lesson. *Must enroll before Sept. 30, 2013.

238 N 4700 E • Rigby, ID  83442

info@snakeriveroutfitters.com

Phone (208) 538-7425

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